A couple new things

One, I reviewed Keith Gessen’s novel A Terrible Country for Commonweal and used the occasion to try to repay (well, acknowledge) some of my own intellectual debts to n+1, a journal of which Gessen was a cofounder.

On a much more serious note, I talked to the nice folks from Cape Town, an excellent superhero podcast, about my abiding and, in all likelihood, indefensible love of Hawkman. I may also have declared my intention to someday get big enough that DC Comics does a stunt-hire and puts me on Hawkman for a story arc that quickly gets canceled. I may have put that into the universe. Do you hear me, Geoff Johns?!?!?!

Appearance on CULTURALLY DETERMINED

Many thanks to Aryeh Cohen-Wade for hosting me on Culturally Determined, his podcast/YouTube show, to talk about my last two essays. Aryeh is a cool guy who asks good questions and affably tolerates my rambling answers.

Some notes: Mom, there are swears. Also, I’m kidding when I say “burn the heretics” re: the use of “impact” as a verb in a certain denomination’s mission statement. I oppose killing except in self-defense.

Here is the ContraPoints episode of Culturally Determined that Aryeh mentions.

New piece for THE OUTLINE on religion and certainty

I am so happy to be making my Outline debut, part of their Unconditional Wisdom series, in which writers take on pieces of conventional wisdom that (in editor Brandy Jensen’s words) “make your eye twitch” with irritation. I decided to say a few things about that old chestnut “Religion is something people turn to so they can have a sense of certainty in a complex world.”

My response to this little platitude is always “I effing wish” and this essay talks about why.

New essay for HEDGEHOG: “What Is It Like To Be a Man”

Besides teaching and my union (yay!) and moving (boo!), this essay was the main thing I spent time on during the first half of this year. It is about masculinity, a subject some of my acquaintances consider me too little qualified to speak on, and others too much. It also talks about lawnmowing, poverty, The GodfatherRiverdale, Bronze Age wrist sizes, why overworked moms make me feel … small, Samuel Delany’s Triton, and the time my then-girlfriend-now-wife and I got robbed at gunpoint. It settles my beefs with the following people:
–Harvey Mansfield
–Carl Jung
–Carl Jung’s one-man shitty Canadian cover band
–all those “traditional men” with YouTube channels and ex-wives who hate them
–the sport of cross-country. Oh, cross-country, why did I waste my time on you when we were so clearly adding nothing to each others’ existences? Why didn’t I just put in three comfy miles a day and spend all those grueling training hours learning Hittite or something?
–that dude who flicked my balls when I was clocking out at McDonalds that one time. Not cool, buddy. We both work at McDonalds. Haven’t we both suffered enough? Can’t we unite against our true enemy, capitalism?

New piece on Michelle Dean’s SHARP

I have some nice and some not-nice things to say about Michelle Dean’s Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art Out Of Having an Opinion over at Christian Century. This was perhaps the book that my corner of Twitter was most excited to preorder last year: a group study of Hannah Arendt, Renata Adler, Joan Didion, Janet Malcolm, etc.? Sign us all up.

New piece on Curtis Dawkins, THE GREYBAR HOTEL, prison writing …

… separating the art from the artist, the State of Michigan’s penchant for cruel and dumb lawsuits, and a number of other things. It is at Commonweal.

Still, the existence of the book scandalizes some readers. Such is the conclusion we must draw, at least, from the lawsuit recently filed by the State of Michigan against Dawkins and his publishers, which seeks to reclaim his book’s royalties to recoup the cost of Dawkins’s incarceration. It should be noted that Michigan, like all other states, appropriates prisoners’ labor at sub-sub-minimum-wage levels for a variety of tasks to ends that nobody any longer seriously pretends are rehabilitative; sometimes in conditions such that, last year at Michigan’s Kinross Correctional Facility, inmates risked death to go on strike. It is just possible that Dawkins is earning his keep. Suits similar to the one filed by Michigan against Dawkins have been levied against imprisoned writers before—most famously, perhaps, in the case of a group of women writers at Connecticut’s York Prison taught and subsequently anthologized by the novelist Wally Lamb. After considerable heartache and expense, that suit was defeated. That Michigan’s government is risking the possibility of such a defeat, and using taxpayer money to do it, might raise one or two questions, especially when one considers that a major Michigan city has been without clean water for, at this writing, well over 1,300 days. One can only marvel at the intensity of the state’s devotion to protecting the readers of The Graybar Hotel from the possibility of moral complicity.

I wrote that in January. Flint’s water situation is still unresolved. Michigan gubernatorial candidate Abdul El-Sayed is the first and, to my knowledge, only such candidate to take a public stance against the Dawkins lawsuit, which is one of many, many reasons that he has my vote.

New piece on INFINITY WAR

Do you need another opinion on Avengers: Infinity War in your life? Let me rephrase that: do you need my opinion on Avengers: Infinity War in your life? Clearly, the answer to the latter question is yes.

(Spoilers!)

(Also, oh man was it satisfying to dismiss Game of Thrones in an aside. Felt good.)